TDR VOS SlickEQ – video review

Read the whole story at modernmixing.com.

 

released: SlickEQ

TDR SlickEQ main flat

TDR VOS SlickEQ is a mixing/mastering equalizer designed for ease of use, musical flexibility and impeccable sound.

Three (and a half) filter-bands arranged in a classic Low/Mid/High semi parametric layout offer fast and intuitive access to four distinct EQ modes, each representing a set of distinct EQ curves and behaviors. An elaborate auto gain option automatically compensates for changes of perceived loudness during EQ operation. Optionally, SlickEQ allows to exclusively process either the stereo sum or stereo difference (i.e. “stereo width”) without additional sum/difference encoding.

In order to warm up the material with additional harmonic content, SlickEQ offers a switchable EQ non-linearity and an output stage with 3 different saturation models. These options are meant to offer subtle and interesting textures, rather than obvious distortion. The effect is made to add the typical “mojo” often associated with classy audio gear.
An advanced 64bit multirate processing scheme practically eliminates typical problems of digital EQ implementations such as frequency-warping, quantization distortion and aliasing.

Beside the primary controls, the plug-in comes with an array of additional helpers: Advanced preset management, undo/redo, quick A/B comparison, copy & paste, an online help, editable labels, mouse-wheel support and much more.

SlickEQ is a collaborative project by Variety Of Sound (Herbert Goldberg) and Tokyo Dawn Labs (Vladislav Goncharov and Fabien Schivre).

Key specs and features

  • Intuitive, yet flexible semi parametric EQ layout
  • Full featured, modern user interface with outstanding usability and ergonomics
  • Carefully designed 64bit “delta” multi-rate structure
  • Three EQ bands with additional 18dB/Oct high-pass filter
  • Four distinct EQ models: “American”, “British”, “German” and “Soviet” with optional non-linearity
  • Four output stages: “Linear”, “Silky”, “Mellow” and “Deep”
  • Advanced saturation algorithms by VoS (“stateful saturation”)
  • Highly effective and musically pleasing loudness compensated auto gain control
  • Oversampled signal path including stateful saturation algorithms
  • Stereo and sum/difference processing options
  • Tool-bar with undo/redo, A/B, advanced preset management and more

Availability

TDR VOS SlickEQ is a freeware audio plug-in available for Windows and Mac in VST and Audio Units format (both 64-bit and 32-bit). VST3 and AAX formats will follow later.

All downloads are available via the Tokyo Dawn Labs website.

Related Links

SlickEQ – some more release info

Just a couple of days ago we introduced the upcoming release of SlickEQ and lots of questions raised already. So, here is what Fabien already committed about it in a public forum:

  • Win/Mac, AU/VST2/VST3 (+AAX planned and in process), x32/x64
  • No linux builds planned, sorry.
  • The name is “TDR VOS Slick EQ” and it will be available for free.
  • Release is a matter of days. Maybe a week or two.

As of today I just want to add: With the introduction of TDR VOS SlickEQ, quite a number of amazing and previously unheard DSP algorithms will see the light of day – including (but not limited to) several Stateful Saturation algorithms running within an audio signal path entirely upsampled to a constant high sample rate for maximum precision.

Expect smoothness, best-in-class.

Related links:

what I’m currently working on – Vol. 12

slickEQ_teaser_flat

Cauz its just cool to have such a slick collection :-)

And of course I better should have titled “what we are currently working on”.

Related links:

SlickHDR 1.0.1 hotfix containing smaller GUI available

Here is a hotfix containing an alternative and smaller GUI version for SlickHDR (Just necessary if you had display problems on smaller screens).

>>> DOWNLOAD <<<

released: SlickHDR

SlickHDRSlickHDR is a “Psychoaccoustic Dynamic Processor” which:

  • balances the perceived global vs. local micro dynamics of any incoming audio.
  • creates a rich in contrast, detailed and clearly perceived image which translates way better across different listening environments.
  • provides a convenient workflow by simply adjusting three dynamic processors to show a roughly same load.
  • offers further and detailed control about overall tone and release time behavior.

The stunning UI artwork and all renders were done by Patrick once again. Made with love in switzerland – as he said!

SlickHDR is a freeware VST audio plug-in for Windows x32 and you can download a copy right here: >>> DOWNLOAD <<<

Related Links

SlickHDR – final teaser & release info

teaserSlickHDR is a “Psychoaccoustic Dynamic Processor” which:

  • balances the perceived global vs. local micro dynamics of any incoming audio.
  • creates a rich in contrast, detailed and clearly perceived image which translates way better across different listening environments.
  • provides a convenient workflow by simply adjusting three dynamic processors to show a roughly same load.
  • offers further and detailed control about overall tone and release time behavior.

Technically speaking, SlickHDR contains a coupled network of three dynamic processors with two of them running in a “stateful saturation” configuration and one based on look-ahead processing.

Fixed amounts of the unprocessed signal are then injected into the network at several specific points and also mixed back into the networks output. Being networked, all processors are highly interacting with each other and this is utilized to cope with a wide variety of sound (sic!) to balance the perceived audio dynamic range.

The stunning UI artwork and render was done by Patrick once again. Made with love in switzerland – as he said.

SlickHDR will be available around end of January 2014 as a freeware VST audio plug-in for Windows x32.

ThrillseekerVBL #1 freeware 2013

bpb-180According to Bedroom Producers Blog, “The title of the best freeware plugin released in 2013 as chosen by BPB goes to the amazing ThrillseekerVBL by Variety Of Sound. It is the latest release in the brilliant Thrillseeker series of freeware effects for Windows.”

processing with High Dynamic Range (3)

This article explores how some different HDR imaging alike techniques can be adopted right into the audio domain.

The early adopters – game developers

In the lately cross-linked article “Finding Your Way With High Dynamic Range Audio In Wwise” some good overview was given on how the HDR concept was already adopted by some game developers over the recent years. Mixing in-game audio has its very own challenge which is about mixing different arbitrary occurring audio events in real-time when the game is actually played. Opposed to that and when we do mix off-line (as in a typical song production) we do have a static output format and don’t have such issues of course.

So it comes as no surprise, that the game developer approach turned out to be a rather automatic/adaptive in-game mixing system which is capable of gating quieter sources depending on the overall volume of the entire audio plus performing some overall compression and limiting. The “off-line mixing audio engineer” can always do better and if a mix is really too difficult, even the arrangement can be fixed by hand during the mixing stage.

There is some further shortcoming and from my point of view that is the too simplistic and reduced translation from “image brightness” into “audio loudness” which might work to some extend but since the audio loudness race has been emerged we already have a clear proof how utterly bad that can sound at the end. At least, there are way more details and effects to be taken into account to perform better concerning dynamic range perception. [Read more...]

processing with High Dynamic Range (2)

This comprehensive and in-depth article about HDR imaging was written by Sven Bontinck, a professional photographer and a hobby-musician.

A matter of perception.

To be able to use HDR in imaging, we must first understand what dynamic range actually means. Sometimes I notice people mistake contrast in pictures with the dynamic range. Those two concepts have some sort of relationship, but are not the same. Let me start by explaining in short how humans receive information with our eyes and ears. This is important because it influences the way we perceive what we see and hear and how we interpret that information.

We all know about the retina in our eyes where we find the light-sensitive sensors, the rods and cones. The cones provide us daytime vision and the perception of colours. The rods allow us to see low-light levels and provide us black-and-white vision. However there is a third kind of photoreceptors, the so-called photosensitive ganglion cells. These cells give our brain information about length-of-day versus length-of-night duration, but also play an important role in the pupillary control. Every sensor need a minimum amount of incitement to be able to react. At the same time all kind of sensors have a maximum amount that they may be exposed to. Above that limit, certain protection mechanisms start interacting to prevent damage occurring to the sensors. [Read more...]

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