In case of VoS plugins not showing up in your VST host

On some Windows installations there are no Visual C++ runtime libraries installed by default anymore. Make sure then to just install that package – for a free and safe download at microsoft.com just lookup “Visual C++ runtime 2013 download”.

VoS on Discord?

VoS on Discord – how about that? Do you use Discord and would this be interesting for you? It could possibly be a platform not only for support but also discussion about plugin ideas, beta testing and stuff like that.

why the Thrillseeker compressors complement each other so well

Audio compressors use either a “feed forward” or “feedback” design to control the gain of an audio signal. In a feed forward compressor, the input signal is used directly to control the gain of the output signal. Essentially, the compressor compares the input signal to a threshold and reduces the gain of the output signal if the input signal exceeds the threshold. In a feedback compressor, the output signal is fed back into the compressor and used to control the gain of the input signal. So, the compressor compares the output signal to a threshold and reduces the gain of the input signal if the output signal exceeds the threshold. Both feed forward and feedback compressors can be effective at controlling the dynamic range of an audio signal, but they operate in slightly different ways and do have different characteristics in terms of their sound and response.

However, the specific sound of a device depends largely on other features of the circuit design and its components. For example, an optoelectric compressor uses a photoresistor or photodiode to detect and control the degree of gain reduction of the signal. But the make-up amplifier afterwards may contribute the most to the sound, depending on its design (tube or solid state). A variable gain tube compressor, on the other hand, uses a vacuum tube to control the gain of the compressor. The vacuum tube is used to amplify the signal, and the gain of the compressor is controlled by changing the bias voltage of the tube. This alone provides a very typical, distinctive sound that is very rich in harmonic overtones.

Both opto-electrical and variable-mu tube compressors are commonly used in audio production to control the dynamic range of a signal, but they operate in different ways and can produce different tonal characteristics. Opto-electrical compressors are known for their fast attack times and smooth release characteristics, while variable-mu tube compressors are known for their warm and smooth sound.

what is a “box tone”?

“Box tone” is a term that is often used to describe the characteristic sound of a particular piece of audio equipment, particularly when it comes to classic analog effects devices such as equalizers and compressors.

The box tone of an effect is often described as the unique timbre or tonal coloration that the device imparts on the audio signal as it passes through it. This can be due to a variety of factors, including the type and quality of the components used in the device, the design of the circuitry, and the way the device processes the signal.

Some audio engineers and producers may seek out specific box tones for their recordings and mixes, as they can add character and depth to the sound. Others may prefer a more neutral or transparent sound, in which case they may choose equipment that has a more subtle or less noticeable box tone.

It’s important to note that the term “box tone” is often used informally and can be somewhat subjective, as different people may have different opinions on what constitutes a distinctive or desirable box tone.

ThrillseekerLA mkII released

ThrillseekerLA mkII – bringing mojo back

ThrillseekerLA is an optical stereo compressor optimized for gentle mix bus coloring. It combines smoothest optical compression with vibrant coloration options that deliver a unique box tone in their own right, including thrilling bass and elegant top end void of any harshness in the mids. Its compression not only glues things together effortlessly but also enhances the stereo image by increasing depth and dimension.

10 years after – new in version 2:

  • Technical redesign with advanced opto cell emulation
  • Simplified gainstaging including automatic output gain compensation
  • Streamlined coloring options: Interstage, Tube and Loudness
  • New compress/limit option and reworked sidechain filtering

The mkII update is available for Windows VST in 32 and 64bit as freeware. Download your copy here.

Related Links:

the beauty of opto-electrical compression – volume 2

When I was looking for a sophisticated stereo compressor for the outboard studio rack a year ago, I was surprised to see how many of the more interesting models now use opto-electric compression technology. Whether transparent or coloring, tube or solid-state amplifiers, transformer or transformerless, even two-channel layouts in mid/side encoding: far advanced compared to all the classic mono replicas.

Optical compressors are usually characterized by their distinct program-dependent compression behavior, mainly based on a physical memory effect in the detector itself. Other subtle nuances are found across the frequency spectrum that affect timing and curve characteristics, creating a complexity that cannot be reduced to simple two-stage controlled release curves, and which is the beauty of opto-electrical compression in its entirety.

Significant audio signal colorations, however, are shaped not by the gain reduction circuitry but by the make-up gain amplifier, whether it is tube or solid-state. Here, the audio transformer also plays an important role in polishing the transients and creating a cohesive sound.

ThrillseekerLA was designed from the beginning in 2012 as a modern stereo compressor with exciting sound coloring possibilities. It is a compressor with authentic opto-electric control behavior in feed-forward circuit topology.

The upcoming mkII update is a technical redesign dedicated solely to improving the sound. It delivers a unique box tone with thrilling bass and elegant top end void of any harshness in the mids. The compression not only glues everything together effortlessly, but also enhances the stereo image by adding depth and dimension.

The release is scheduled for mid-December.

now that we’ve reinvented 8-bit audio – what’s next?

Gone are the days when choosing the right noise shaping for dithering was a headache and we were still dreaming of Hires Audio as the glorious upcoming consumer format. In the end, it was more important to us to make everything brutally loud. As if it could otherwise be overheard in all the streaming mush: Radio and advertising have led the way, after all, and in the realm of asocial media, the cry for attention is naturally even louder. A pleasant sound, transient-rich and detailed? Forget it! The pitiful remainder of dynamics could now be packaged in 8-bit, lossless. That’s how it looks. The other day I saw a report about audiophiles who still and tirelessly spare neither expense nor effort to optimize the sound at home down to the smallest detail, which seemed unintentionally comical in this context. But it seems just as anachronistic today to spend such an immense technical effort for an inferior production performance. How can this be justified? Surely any stock EQ, a decent multiband compressor and limiter should suffice. In the attached video, the evolution of EDM is outlined in fast forward from the 80s to 2020. Regardless of the qualities of the codecs, this shows very impressively the decline in technical production quality over the years and the side effects of the increase in loudness. Now that we have successfully ruined audio quality, the question remains: What’s next?

the history of Cubase

When Cubase 3.0 came out in 1996 and introduced VST for the first time with all its new and fascinating possibilities, that was the point where I decided to get more involved in music production and set up a small (home) recording studio. VST was the basis for all this and how I imagined a modern (computer based) studio production. What a revolution that was. Watching this video today brings up a lot of nostalgic feelings …

dream studio

ThrillseekerVBL mkII released

ThrillseekerVBL mkII – bringing mojo back

Even though extensively revised, ThrillseekerVBL remains true to its credo and combines musical gain-riding and thrilling distortion. The mkII version improves both the user experience and its technical implementation, giving more sonic control and a versatile sound. Being able to reproduce quite a range of tonalities now, ThrillseekerVBL has become a true tonebox that can deliver Variable-Mu style tube compression whether soft and mellow or punchy and raw.

The mkII update is available for Windows VST in 32 and 64bit as freeware. Download your copy here.

Related Links:

I need your support!

Since I left Facebook and also don’t have the time to join all these forums – could you support me here and share the info about releases, updates etc. in your social media sphere? Maybe a note in a forum, something like that.
Just help me spread the word ….
Thanks in advance!
Herbert