the history of Cubase

When Cubase 3.0 came out in 1996 and introduced VST for the first time with all its new and fascinating possibilities, that was the point where I decided to get more involved in music production and set up a small (home) recording studio. VST was the basis for all this and how I imagined a modern (computer based) studio production. What a revolution that was. Watching this video today brings up a lot of nostalgic feelings …

TesslaPRO mkIII released

the magic is where the transient happens

The Tessla audio plugin series once started as a reminiscence to classic transformer based circuit designs of the 50s and 60s but without just being a clone stuck in the past. The PRO version has been made for mixing and mastering engineers working in the digital domain but always missing that extra vibe delivered by some highend analog devices.

TesslaPRO brings back the subtle artifacts from the analog right into the digital domain. It sligthly colors the sound, polishes transients and creates depth and dimension in the stereo field to get that cohesive sound we’re after. All the analog goodness in subtle doses: It’s a mixing effect intended to be used here and there, wherever the mix demands it.

The mkIII version is a technical redesign, further refined to capture all those sonic details while reducing audible distortions at the same time. It further blurs the line between compression and saturation and also takes aural perception based effects into account.

Available for Windows VST in 32 and 64bit as freeware. Download your copy here.

BootEQ mkIII released

BootEQ mkIII – a musical sounding Preamp/EQ

BootEQ mkIII is a musical sounding mixing EQ and pre-amplifier simulation. With its
four parametric and independent EQ bands it offers special selected and musical
sounding asymmetric and proportional EQ curves capable of reproducing several
‘classic’ EQ curves and tones accordingly.

It provides further audio coloration capabilities utilizing pre-amplifier harmonic distortion as well as tube and transformer-style signal saturation. Within its mkIII incarnation, the Preamp itself contains an opto-style compression circuit providing a very distinct and consistent harmonic distortion profile over a wide range of input levels, all based now on a true stateful saturation model.

Also the EQ curve slopes has been revised, plugin calibration takes place for better gain-staging and metering and the plugin offers zero latency processing now.

Available for Windows VST in 32 and 64bit as freeware. Download your copy here.

audio analyzers currently in use here

During tracking, mixing and mixdown I’m utilizing different analyzers whether thats freeware or commercial, hard- or software. Each of them doing a decent job in its very own area:

VU Meter

Always in good use during tracking and mixing mainly for checking channel levels and gainstaging all kinds of plugins. I also love to have a VU right on the mixbus to get a quick visual indication about Peak vs RMS dynamic behaviour.

TBProAudio mvMeter2 is freeware and actually meters not only VU but also RMS, EBU LU as well as PPM. It is also resizeable (VST3 version) and supports different skins.

Spectrum Analyzer I

To me, the Voxengo SPAN is an all-time classic analyzer and ever so reliable. I’ve always used it to have a quick indication about an instruments frequency coverage or the overall frequency balance on the mixbus. There is always one running at the very end of the summing bus in the post-fader section.

Voxengo SPAN is also freeware and highly customizable regarding the analyzer FFT resolution, slope smoothing and ballistics.

Spectrum Analyzer II

Another spectrum analyzer I’m using is Voxengo TEOTE which actually is not only an analyzer but a full spectrum dynamic processor. However, let alone the analyzer itself (fully working in demo mode!) is an excellent assistant when it comes to assess the overall frequency balance. The analyzer does this in regards to a full spectrum noise profile which is adjustable with a Tilt EQ, basically. Very handy for judging deviations (over time) from an ideal frequency response.

Voxengo TEOTE demo version available on their website.

Loudness Metering

I’m leaving all EBU R128 related business to the TC Electronic Clarity M. Since it is a hardware based monitoring solution it always is active here on my desktop no matter what and also serves for double-checking equal RMS levels (for A/B comparisions) and a quick look at the frequency balance from time to time. The hardware is connected via USB (could be SPDIF as well) and is driven by a small remote plugin sitting at the very end of the summing bus in my setup here. It also offers a vector scope and provides audio correlation information. It supports a vast variety of professional metering standards.

Courtesy of Music Tribe IP Ltd.

Image Courtesy of Music Tribe IP Ltd.

 

 

 

Dynamic 1073/84 EQ curves?

Yes we can! The 1073 and 84 high shelving filters are featuring that classic frequency dip upfront the HF boost itself. Technically speaking they are not shelves but bell curves with a very wide Q but anyway, wouldn’t it be great if that would be program dependent in terms of expanding and compressing according to the curve shape and giving a dynamic frequency response to the program material?

Again, dynamic EQs makes this an easy task today and I just created some presets for the TDR Nova EQ which you can copy right from here (see below after the break). Instructions: Choose one of the 3 presets (one for each specific original frequency setting – 10/12/16kHz) and just tune the Threshold parameter for band IV (dip operation) and band V (boost operation) to fit to the actual mix situation.

They sound pretty much awesome! See also my Nova presets for the mixbus over here and the Pultec ones here.

[Read more…]

Dynamic Pultec EQ curves?

Wouldn’t it be great if the Pultec boost/cut performance would be program dependent? Sort of expanding and compressing according to the boost/cut settings and giving a dynamic frequency response to the program material.

Well, dynamic EQs makes this an easy task today and I just created some presets for the TDR Nova EQ which you can copy right from here (see below after the break). Instructions: Choose one of the 4 presets (one for each specific original frequency setting – 20/30/60/100Hz) and tune the Threshold parameter for band II (boost operation) and band III (cut operation) to fit to the actual mix situation.

See also my presets for the mixbus over here.

[Read more…]

Lets talk about mixing levels (again)

Some years ago we had lots of discussions about proper mixing levels in the digital domain – with mixed (sic!) results, IIRC. Meanwhile, more and more influencers are claiming that targeting -18dBFS with a VU meter readout is the “digital audio sweet spot” and the way forward in terms of plugin gain staging. In practise that would imply mixing digital peak levels at around 0dBFS again but maybe I’ve missed something during my absence in recent years. So, to what mixing levels are you up to in your DAW today?

The Korg SDD-3000 – perfect for LoFi?

By accident, I recently stumbled upon the UAD Korg SDD-3000 digital delay version. When I noticed that they modelled also its amplifiers as well as the 13bit converters they immediately got my attention. Having also high- and low-pass filters on board, this could easily double as a great lofi device – so lets have a closer look.

As in the original hardware, the device offers several gain stage adjustments for both input and ouptut, intended to match different instrument or line level signals. These amplifiers are always in, no matter if the BYPASS switch is activated or not. Interestingly, UA also integrated this in its “Unison” interface feature as an preamp option.

Depending on how hard the input gain is driven, quite heavy distortion and saturation effects can occur. As soon as the Bypass is deactivated, the effect signal path containing the 13bit converted and HP/LP filtered signal can be dialed in with the LEVEL BALANCE. If this balance is now set to EFFECT only or just the WET SOLO option has been turned on (plus avoiding any amounts of feedback in this case) the device now offers a pretty much nicely degraded signal path for any sort of creative effects. Depending on the actual settings one can dial in now some really creamy or even gritty effects. Be aware, that this signal path contains an additional delay according to the DELAY TIME setting, of course.

The analysis charts are showing – from left to right – the basic frequency response (in bypass mode), some example harmonic distortions when hitting the input gain quite hard and the filtered effect signal path frequency response according to the UI settings above. The slight frequency bump on the right side of the charts might be caused by the plugin oversampling filters – the original hardware does not show this and its spectrum ends somewhere around 17kHz.

As in the original hardware, all settings are just within limited ranges and so it is not that flexible in general. However, soundwise its pretty much awesome. Oh and by the way, it also doubles as a simple but impressive delay πŸ˜‰

mixing does not mean restoration

If you prepare a track and something like β€œwhere is my damn 64dB/octave brickwall filter?” comes to your mind then this might be because you are not upfront any mixing process but are working on audio restoration instead. Or the sources just might be crap. Always remember: garbage in, garbage out.

I’ve just re-discovered preFIX.

preFix_teaser

a very comprehensive review on Thrillseeker VBL

And don’t miss to read the whole review here with lots of hands-on examples.