Stepped controls in SlickEQ

vladg/sound

Why do you want to use stepped controls in an equalizer? I see 2 possible reasons:

  1. To quickly adjust the sound you like (something like a coarse tuning before the fine tuning)
  2. To quickly match 2 instances of the plugin

Probably you didn’t know that SlickEQ supports stepped controls by right mouse drag or Ctrl + mouse drag on knobs.

Stepped controls in SlickEQ

This is how the snap points are defined by default:

lowBandFreqParam=”30,40,60,85,120,175,250,350,500,700,1k”
midBandFreqParam=”100,150,250,400,650,1k,1.5k,2.5k,4k,6.3k,10k”
highBandFreqParam=”500,750,1.2k,1.8k,2.8k,4.4k,7k,10k,16k,25k,40k”
hpFreqParam=”10,15,20,30,40,60,85,120,170,250,350″
lowBandGainParam=”-18,-16,-14,-12,-10,-8,-6,-4,-2,0,2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18″
midBandGainParam=”-18,-16,-14,-12,-10,-8,-6,-4,-2,0,2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18″
highBandGainParam=”-18,-16,-14,-12,-10,-8,-6,-4,-2,0,2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18″

And now the secret information. The snap points can be changed! Unfortunately it doesn’t work per-preset basis but only as global setting.

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A classification of digital equalizers (draft)

A must read for EQ aficionados 🙂
Thanks Vlad for sharing!

vladg/sound

Okay, this is my first try to make some kind of classification of digital equalizers. It’s mostly based on some defects or features they have in their responses. These defects or features give digital equalizers their unique sound. Sometimes they sound “digital” in bad meaning of this word (i.e. “harsh”) but the other side of digital sound is clean, pristine and maybe too cold sometimes. I don’t have much time to make this classification really glossy so it’s some kind of a draft.

In my opinion there’re 7 main properties of digital equalizers, which affect their sound:

  1. Frequency response behavior near Nyquist frequency
  2. Phase response behavior near Nyquist frequency
  3. Frequency response ringing
  4. Types of Curves
  5. Time domain response
  6. Saturation
  7. Noise

Now I’m going to try to illustrate possible cases for each property by some images mostly created by VST Plugin Analyzer. All pictures were created at 44.1 kHz sample rate…

View original post 1,979 more words

flying fingers

announcing SlickEQ “Gentleman’s Edition”

SlickEQGE

It’s going to be the second joint venture between Vlad and Fabien from Tokyo Dawn Labs and Herbert from Variety Of Sound: The SlickEQ Gentleman’s Edition.

So what will be new and different to that already released SlickEQ? [Read more…]

utilizing early reflections in a production

A quite often underestimated or even forgotten production technique is to take advantage of artificial early reflections which could be added somewhere during the mixing process. Without inserting any fully fledged reverberation at all, applying such techniques allows to dramatically increase stereo width and depth perception as well as a way better instrument localization even in a busy mix. Creating density is not the goal here but the opposite is the name of the game: achieving a clear and intelligible mix.

In a simple case, one can place a short and plain delay (a slap-back echo) on a track and properly place it in the stereo field – maybe on the opposite side of the source but that’s just an example. More sophisticated tap delays could be used to create a sort of room experience and some reverberators are allowing to disable the late reverb diffusion and just to use their early reflection generation. There are no restrictions in general – allowed is what gets the job done in that specific mixing situation.

Iceland: Beyond Sigur Rós

… the 30 minute documentary features insightful interviews with Haukur Magnússon, flamboyant editor of Reykjavík’s Grapevine Magazine, Ólafur Arnalds, world renowned pop-classical composer and music producer, and Pétur Úlfur Einarsson and Hafsteinn Michael Guðmundsson, ambitious co-founders behind online music distributor Gogoyoko.

Ólafur Arnalds & Nils Frahm

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/49131274 w=660&h=495]

quote of the day

Master all the equipment you use. That’s the key. – Pharrell

I Haven't Had My Coffee Yet -- Don't Make Me Kill You!

You can hear sound clips of this and other reviewed pieces of gear here: http://jordantishler.wordpress.com/gear-review-clips/

Designed as a cost-effective means of achieving vintage sound, the API 7600 contains a 212L mic pre, a 225L compressor, and a reissue of the original 550A EQ module.

Best used as a rack mounted mixing module, the 7600 features four aux sends, pre or post fader assignable, four buss sends, compressor link, external fader extensions, 7 segment LED meters as well as the usual channel controls including pan, solo, mute, Phantom power, polarity reverse and an automatic or manual selectable output section.

As with all API gear the 7600 has a signature sound.  The 7600 delivers aggressive low-mids forward tone. First in the signal chain comes the 212 preamp, a legend for recording guitars.

Second, the VCA (Voltage Controlled Amplifier) driven 225L compressor section is highly versatile. VCA driven circuits are very predictable and…

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https://varietyofsound.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/3067/

epicVerb vstpresets up again

The epicVerb vstpresets had been not available to download for quite a while and that was because the eV 1.5 update had broke compatibility. The stuff is back online again now.

What is that file about? It only matters for Cubase 4 (or higher) users and provides the original factory preset bank but with additional 25:75 and 50:50 dry/wet mix levels so one could use the presets more easily on the insert bus. I hope someday eV will have a “wet only” switch (or such alike) to make this obsolet.

To download the vstpresets archive just go to the downloads page here. Credits goes to user susiwong.