The TesslaSE Remake

There were so many requests to revive the old and rusty TesslaSE which I’ve once moved already into the legacy folder. In this article I’m going to talk a little bit about the history of the plugin and its upcoming remake.

The original TesslaSE audio plugin was one of my first DSP designs aiming at a convincing analog signal path emulation and it was created already 15 years ago! In its release info it stated to “model pleasant sounding ‘electric effects’ coming from transformer coupled tube circuits in a digital controlled fashion” which basically refers to adding harmonic content and some subtle saturation as well as spatial effects to the incoming audio. In contrast to static waveshaping approaches quite common to that time, those effects were already inherently frequency dependent and managed within a mid/side matrix underneath.

(Later on, this approach emerged into a true stateful saturation framework capable of modeling not only memoryless circuits and the TesslaPro version took advantage of audio transient management as well.)

This design was also utilized to supress unwanted aliasing artifacts since flawless oversampling was still computational expensive to that time. And offering zero latency on top, TesslaSE always had a clear focus on being applied over the entire mixing stage, providing all those analog signal path subtleties here and there. All later revisions also sticked to the very same concept.

With the 2021 remake, TesslaSE mkII won’t change that as well but just polishing whats already there. The internal gainstaging has been reworked so that everything appears gain compensated to the outside and is dead-easy to operate within a slick, modernized user interface. Also the transformer/tube cicuit modeling got some updates now to appear more detailed and vibrant, while all non-linear algorithms got oversampled for additional aliasing supression.

On my very own, I really enjoy the elegant sound of the update now!

TesslaSE mkII will be released by end of November for PC/VST under a freeware license.

Pianobook community sample libraries

If you did not stumbled across this awesome community project yet, you definetely should have a look at it. In particular if you are into anything sound design or film scoring related.

“Pianobook is a collective sample project inspiring musicians to embrace the magic of sampling and share their creations with the community.”

pianobook.co.uk

If offers a sheer number (520 at the time of writing) of sample libraries free to download and use. The actual content is not limited to piano libraries but meanwhile contains quite a range of different acoustic instruments or even voices and some synthetic stuff.

While centered around Kontakt capabilities when once started, it meanwhile offers also downloads in EXS or Decent Sampler format, at least to some extend. On top, it is an open project and invites everybody to also contribute to the library.

One should definitately check out the upright pianos to discover some real gems. Also the “found sounds” section reveals some great discoveries. To get a glimpse and more easy access to the library as a whole, I strongly recommend the according YT channel.

 

mastering a track using only FREE Plugins

Featuring BaxterEQ and FerricTDS.

(via)

freeware tip: TDR Feedback Compressor II

If you did not tried this one out yet but are looking for an absolutely clean and transparent compressor then do check this one out!

The TDR Feedback Compressor II is a major design update of its critically acclaimed predecessor. The compressor is dedicated to the highest fidelity stereo program (2-buss) compression, but shines equally in classic mixing tasks. – Fabien from TDR

It features detailed control of compression behaviour, extremely low distortion and it’s compression is almost “invisible”. Download the freeware over there at tokyodawn.net.

a Density mkIII review

Christopher A. Dorval Dion kindly gave me permission to re-blog his review he made for Quantum-Music.ca:

Variety of Sound – Density MKIII (Review)

[Read more…]

freeware tip: Phazor VST audio effect by Adam Szabo

Phazor is a free effect plugin, which emulates the phaser effect found in the Virus synthesizers, which helped make its characteristic sound. A lot of time was devoted to make it sound very close to the original and every control has been carefully adjusted to behave just like the phaser from the Virus. […]

Read more detailed info about it on his website www.adamszabo.com – there is a nice audio comparison as well. The download is available there for Win32 only.

hardware makes you look good

“Hardware ist schön, Hardware ist groß, Hardware kleidet sehr gut” – as stated by Christoph Kemper (developer of the famous Access Virus) in a recent interview for the german Musotalk online magazine. Which basically translates into something like “Hardware is big, hardware is sexy, hardware makes you look good”. While this was held in the context of the developments of his brand new “Kemper Profiling Amp” and about what we still actually see on a typical live stage today (and what is just a fake), it still seems to be the paradigm in quite some studios as well. [Read more…]

top 10 again

“These plug-ins are something special, combining elegant design with real sonic character. There’s loads of freeware that can handle standard mix-balancing tasks, but if you’re looking for serious subjective tonal enhancement then there are few developers who can match Variety Of Sound for musicality.”

— Mike Senior, author of ‘Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio‘ and Sound On Sound‘s ‘Mix Rescue’ & ‘Mix Review’ columns.