compressor aficionados (10) – Vladislav Goncharov

Vlad, what was your very first DSP plugin development, how did it once started and what was your motivation behind?

My first plugin was simple a audio clipper. But I decided to not release it. So my first public released plugin was Molot compressor. I was a professional software engineer but with zero DSP knowledge (my education was about databases, computer networks and stuff like that). I played a guitar as a hobby, recorded demos at home and one day I found that such thing as audio plugins exist. I was amazed by their amount and also by the fact that there are free plugins too. And I realised that one day I can build something like this myself. I just had to open a DSP book, read a chapter or two and it was enough to start. So my main motivation was curiosity, actually.

Was that Molot compressor concept inspired by some existing devices or a rather plain DSP text book approach?

That days there was a rumour that it’s impossible to make good sounding digital compressor because of aliasing and stuff. I tried to make digital implementation as fluid as possible, without hard yes/no logic believing this is how perfect digital compressor should sound. And the way I implemented the algorithm made the compressor to sound unlike anything I heard before. I didn’t had any existing devices in my head to match and I didn’t watch textbook implementations too. The sound was just how I made it. I did 8 versions of the algorithm trying to make it as usable as possible from user point perspective (for example “harder” knee should sound “harder”, I removed dual-band implementation because it was hard to operate) and the last version of the project was named “comp8”.

Did you maintained that specific sound within Molot when you relaunched it under the TDR joint venture later on? And while we are at it: When and how did that cooperation with Fabien started?

TDR Molot development was started with the same core sound implementation as original Molot had. But next I tried to rework every aspect of the DSP to make it sound better but keep the original feel at the same time. It was very hard but I think I succeeded. I’m very proud of how I integrated feedback mode into TDR Molot for example. About Fabien: He wrote me to discuss faults in my implementation he thought I had (I’m not sure it was Molot or Limiter 6), we also discussed TDR Feedback Compressor he released that days, we argued against each other but what’s strange the next day we both changed our minds and agreed with our opposite opinions. It was like “You were right yesterday. No, I think you were right”. Next there was “KVR Developer Challenge” and Fabien suggested to collaborate and create a product for this competition. That was 2012.

And the Feedback Compressor was the basis for Kotelnikov later on, right?

No, Kotelnikov is 100% different from Feedback Compressor. Fabien tried to make the sound of feedback compressor more controllable and found that the best way to achieve this is just to change the topology to feedforward one. It’s better to say, Feedback Compressor led to Kotelnikov. Also the interesting fact, early version of Kotelnikov had also additional feedback mode but I asked Fabien to remove it because it was the most boring compressor sound I ever heard. I mean if you add more control into feedback circuit, it just ruins the sound.

Must have been a challenge to obtain such a smooth sound from a feed-forward topology. In general, what do you think makes a dynamic processor stand out these days especially but not limited to mastering?

I think, it’s an intelligent control over reactions. For example Kotelnikov has some hidden mechanisms working under the hood, users don’t have access to them but they help to achieve good sound. I don’t think it’s good idea to expose all internal parameters to the user. There must be hidden helpers just doing their job.

I so much agree on that! Do you see any new and specific demand concerning limiting and maximizing purposes? I’m just wondering how the loudness race will continue and if we ever going to see a retro trend towards a more relaxed sound again …

I think even in perfect loudness normalized world most of the music is still consumed in noisy environments. The processing allowing the quietest details to be heard and cut through background noise, to retain the feel of punch and density even at low volumes is in demand these days. Loudness maximizers can do all this stuff but in this context they act like old broadcast processors. In my opinion, the loudness war will continue but it’s not for overall mix loudness anymore but how loud and clear each tiny detail of the mix should be.

Can we have a brief glimpse on what you are currently focused on, DSP development wise?

You may take a look at Tokyo Dawn Labs Facebook posts. We shared a couple of screenshots some time ago. That’s our main project to be released someday. But also we work on a couple of dynamic processors in parallel. We set high mark on the quality of our products so we have to keep it that high and that’s why the development is so slow. We develop for months and months until the product is good enough to be released. That’s why we usually don’t have estimation dates of release.

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Comments

  1. beatcreatives says:

    This was an interesting read. I still use the TDR VOS Slick EQ. It is such a gem.

  2. “You were right yesterday. No, I think you were right”

    Haha, this is awesome!

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