FlavourMTC “Mixbus Tone Control” released

FlavourMTC follows classic “passive” equalizer designs where the EQ circuits itself are not able to amplify signals but a dedicated amplifier stage takes care of it. Those EQ designs are well known for allowing very transparent frequency changes while their amplifier designs do add some icing on the cake quite often.

mixbus tone control – closest to analog

FlavourMTC implements this by utilizing 1st order shelving filter designs avoiding unwanted resonances and takes advantage of “zero delay” implementations for most accurate higher order filtering and w/o introducing curve warping near Nyquist frequency. The output amplifier stage of the plugin can be calibrated according specific mixing levels, provides a distinct “box tone” and glues everything together. Parts of the plugin are oversampled internally for maximum transparency and sound quality.

Available for Windows VST in 32 and 64bit as freeware. Download your copy here.

interview series (11) – Andreas Eschenwecker

Andy, your Vertigo VSC compressor has already become a modern classic. What has been driven you to create such a device?

I really like VCA compressors. VCA technology gives you a lot of freedom in design and development and the user gets a very flexible tool at the end. I was very unhappy with all VCA compressors on the market around 2000. Those were not very flexible for different applications. These units were working good in one certain setting only. Changing threshold or other parameters was fiddley and so on. But the main point starting the VSC project was the new IC VCA based compressors sounded one dimensional and boxy.

Does this mean your design goal was to have a more transparent sounding device or does the VSC also adds a certain sound but just in a different/better way?

Transparency without sounding clean and artificial. The discrete Vertigo VCAs deliver up to 0,6% THD. Distortion can deliver depth without sounding muddy.

Does this design favour certain harmonics or – the other way around – supresses some unwanted distortions?

The VSC adds a different distortion spectrum depending when increasing input level or adding make-up. The most interesting fact is that most of the distortion and artifacts are created in the release phase of the compressor. The distortion is not created on signal peaks. It’s becoming obvious when the compressor sets back from gainreduction to zero gainreduction. Similar to a reverb swoosh… after the peak that was leveled.

Where does your inspiration comes from for such technical designs?

With my former company I repaired and did measurements on many common classic and sometimes ultra-rare compressors. Some sounded pretty good but were unreliable – some were very intuitive in a studio situation, some not…
At this time I slowly developed an idea what kind of compressor I would like to use in daily use.

From your point of view: To which extend did the compressor design principles changed over the years?

The designs changed a lot. Less discrete parts, less opto compressors (because a lot of essential parts are no longer produced), tube compressors suffer from poor new tube manufacturing and some designers nowadays go more for RMS detection and feed forward topology. With modern components there was no need for a feedback SC arrangement anymore. I think RMS is very common now because of its easy use at the first glance. For most applications I prefer Peak detection.

Having also a VSC software version available: Was it difficult to transfer all that analog experience into the digital domain? What was the challenge?

In my opinion the challenge is to sort out where to focus on. What influence has the input transformer or the output stage? Yes some of course. Indeed most of the work was going into emulating the detection circuit.

Which advantages did you experienced with the digital implementation or do you consider analog to be superior in general?

I am more an analog guy. So I still prefer the hardware. What I like about the digital emulations is that some functions are easy to implement in digital and would cost a fortune in production of the analog unit.

Any plans for the future you might want to share?

At the moment I struggle with component delays. 2021/22 is not the right time for new analog developments. I guess some new digital products come first.

Related Links

SlickEQ – some more release info

Just a couple of days ago we introduced the upcoming release of SlickEQ and lots of questions raised already. So, here is what Fabien already committed about it in a public forum:

  • Win/Mac, AU/VST2/VST3 (+AAX planned and in process), x32/x64
  • No linux builds planned, sorry.
  • The name is “TDR VOS Slick EQ” and it will be available for free.
  • Release is a matter of days. Maybe a week or two.

As of today I just want to add: With the introduction of TDR VOS SlickEQ, quite a number of amazing and previously unheard DSP algorithms will see the light of day – including (but not limited to) several Stateful Saturation algorithms running within an audio signal path entirely upsampled to a constant high sample rate for maximum precision.

Expect smoothness, best-in-class.

Related links:

quote of the day

Art is the most beautiful deception of all. And although people try to incorporate the everyday events of life in it, we must hope that it will remain a deception lest it become a utilitarian thing, sad as a factory.

— Claude Debussy

introducing NastyDLA

There are just a few audio effects available that are capable of instantly turning a small and wimpy riff into something big and meaningful. One of them is the classic chorus/echo combination. Beside the individual classic echo or chorus devices these combined devices were historically build around true tape or bucket brigade delays.

From today’s production standards perspective they might be easily overseen (feature wise) but on the other hand they are still pretty much demanded due to their specific and warm tone and this unique sound quality is probably the charm which still today attracts producers and audio engineers to use them in their actual music productions.

NastyDLA is going to follow this path and recreates all the specific tone qualities while adding just some few but well selected modern features. The plug-in implements some of the most distinctive and much appreciated sonic effects generated by these devices:

  • classic chorus and echo effects
  • authentic signal path coloration
  • tape-delay style feedback and saturation

NastyDLA applies gentle feedback driven delay effects, performs smooth audio signal modulations and adds extra harmonics and saturation effects. It will be available as a freeware VST plug-in for Win32 compatible systems later this autumn.

related links: the classic chorus echo device

FerricTDS updates to 1.5

FerricTDS_1.5

FerricTDS 1.5

After 3 month of bugfixing, improving and testing, version 1.5 of the award-winning tape dynamics simulator is finally available as of today. It features numerous fixes and additions and if you did not tried it yet don’t miss it now! [Read more…]