out now: SlickEQ “Gentleman’s Edition”

SlickEQ_German

Key specs and features

  • Modern user interface with outstanding usability and ergonomics
  • Carefully designed 64bit “delta” multi-rate structure
  • Three semi-parametric filter bands, each with two shape options
  • Five distinct EQ models: American, British, German, Soviet and Japanese
  • Low band offers an optional phase-lag able to delay low frequencies relative to higher frequencies
  • High pass filter with optional “Bump” mode
  • Low pass filter with two different slopes (6dB/Oct and 12dB/Oct)
  • Parametric Tilt filter with optional “V” mode.
  • Six output stages: Linear, Silky, Mellow, Deep, Excited and Toasted
  • Advanced saturation algorithms by VoS (“Stateful saturation”)
  • Highly effective loudness compensated auto gain control
  • Stereo, mono and sum/difference (mid/side) processing options
  • Frequency magnitude plot
  • Tool-bar with undo/redo, A/B, advanced preset management and more

SlickEQ is a collaborative project by Variety of Sound (Herbert Goldberg) and Tokyo Dawn Labs (Vladislav Goncharov and Fabien Schivre). For more details, please refer to the official product page: http://www.tokyodawn.net/tdr-vos-slickeq-ge/

Related

Advertisements

released: SlickEQ

TDR SlickEQ main flat

TDR VOS SlickEQ is a mixing/mastering equalizer designed for ease of use, musical flexibility and impeccable sound.

Three (and a half) filter-bands arranged in a classic Low/Mid/High semi parametric layout offer fast and intuitive access to four distinct EQ modes, each representing a set of distinct EQ curves and behaviors. An elaborate auto gain option automatically compensates for changes of perceived loudness during EQ operation. Optionally, SlickEQ allows to exclusively process either the stereo sum or stereo difference (i.e. “stereo width”) without additional sum/difference encoding.

In order to warm up the material with additional harmonic content, SlickEQ offers a switchable EQ non-linearity and an output stage with 3 different saturation models. These options are meant to offer subtle and interesting textures, rather than obvious distortion. The effect is made to add the typical “mojo” often associated with classy audio gear.
An advanced 64bit multirate processing scheme practically eliminates typical problems of digital EQ implementations such as frequency-warping, quantization distortion and aliasing.

Beside the primary controls, the plug-in comes with an array of additional helpers: Advanced preset management, undo/redo, quick A/B comparison, copy & paste, an online help, editable labels, mouse-wheel support and much more.

SlickEQ is a collaborative project by Variety Of Sound (Herbert Goldberg) and Tokyo Dawn Labs (Vladislav Goncharov and Fabien Schivre).

Key specs and features

  • Intuitive, yet flexible semi parametric EQ layout
  • Full featured, modern user interface with outstanding usability and ergonomics
  • Carefully designed 64bit “delta” multi-rate structure
  • Three EQ bands with additional 18dB/Oct high-pass filter
  • Four distinct EQ models: “American”, “British”, “German” and “Soviet” with optional non-linearity
  • Four output stages: “Linear”, “Silky”, “Mellow” and “Deep”
  • Advanced saturation algorithms by VoS (“stateful saturation”)
  • Highly effective and musically pleasing loudness compensated auto gain control
  • Oversampled signal path including stateful saturation algorithms
  • Stereo and sum/difference processing options
  • Tool-bar with undo/redo, A/B, advanced preset management and more

Availability

TDR VOS SlickEQ is a freeware audio plug-in available for Windows and Mac in VST and Audio Units format (both 64-bit and 32-bit). VST3 and AAX formats will follow later.

All downloads are available via the Tokyo Dawn Labs website.

Related Links

compressor aficionados (4) – Bob Olhsson

Bob, you are a professional recording and mastering engineer for over thirty years and already legend. What is more important: The ability to hear or the ability to use the right device according to the context and to apply the right adjustment?

You need to BOTH be able to hear AND find the right device and settings! Probably the most important thing to understand is that just raising the volume a tenth of a dB. will always sound better. All comparisons must be checked with the average level compensated. Otherwise, it’s easy to wind up with something that’s louder but far worse sounding.

Another challenge is mastering for what the recording needs and not what your monitors want. Our goal is for it to sound great everywhere. The best way I’ve found to tackle this problem is sticking to broad strokes unless I’m removing distractions. If a half dB. sounds different but not better, I’ll generally leave it alone. [Read more…]

what Psychoacoustics is about

If you once listened to MPEG 1 Audio Layer 3 (aka mp3) compressed audio files you’ve already heard some encoding algorithms which are highly based on psychoacoustic principles. But what is that voodoo stuff all about in general? The science of psychoacoustics basically investigates the impact of a physical audio signals property on to the subjective perceived signal (hearing) and whats going on under the hood of that hearing, meanwhile. So it can basically be seen as an input/output model where a certain acoustic stimuli comes in and some sort of perception comes out. On top of that, hearing has not just been seen as a black box but a lot of modelling has already been done to get a better understanding on how hearing is actually performed in our bio-mechanical apparatus and our brain as well. [Read more…]

loudness wars – episode IV

Yes, a new hope. While some of the recently established  metering systems did not successfully managed the loudness race problems in general there seems to be a new hope concerning those issues and this comes from the broadcasters standardization efforts. Started in 2006 the ITU recommendation BS.1770­‐1 defined already some replacement for the common QPPM metering and instead was oriented towards loudness metering. [Read more…]

about audio signal coloration

In this comprehensive article some deeper explorations and explanations on this topic are given and at the end a brief but handy definition about audio signal coloration is proposed.  Some tips on mixing can be obtained here as well and – by the way – some myth about equalizing audio in the digital domain gets busted.

Digital image spectrum

Digital imaging spectrum

[Read more…]